Solar

VSECU Goes Solar!

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VSECU Goes Solar!

Over the past three plus months, the Soveren team has been working on a 500kW Solar PV ground installation in Guilford, VT. The power from this project is going to offset the utility bills of the Vermont State Employees Credit Union (VSECU) branches across VT. Yesterday, October 25th, was the ceremonial “throwing of the switch” on site. With representative from Soveren and VSECU present, as well as the Brattleboro Reformer and the Commons, we celebrated this landmark event for both institutions. This is Soveren’s biggest installation to date and represents months of innovation and creative investments. We are thrilled to work with VSECU, a local not-for-profit credit union,  and to do our part make their dream of going solar a reality. You can read their full article...

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China’s Solar Market Continues To Boom

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China continues to plow forward installing solar to meet its ever increasing energy demands, having installed over 15 gigawatts of solar capacity in 2015, however it is yet to be seen whether this trend is economically sustainable. Much of China’s solar capacity is installed but not yet online, and the country continues to build additional coal-fired power plants despite having the some of the most polluted air of any country. Currently their total installed capacity sits around 43 gigawatts, making them the leader internationally of installed capacity. The government is aiming to install 15-20 gigawatts of solar per year as part of their next 5-year plan. By 2020 China aims to have 140 gigawatts of installed solar. To put that into scale, the  total installed solar capacity worldwide is expected to reach 321 gigawatts by the end of this year. Installations continue and production is ramping up, but some experts have concerns that the market may be becoming oversaturated with production that exceeds global demand. Read More Here:...

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How Much Carbon Emissions Do Solar Panels Offset?

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In pursuit of cleaner energy and reduced carbon emission, it would be imprudent to not consider the carbon costs in the creation of solar panels themselves. Luckily, solar technology has been around the block, and analysis have been done on how much they offset versus how much carbon has been emitted in their creation. It is calculated that 1kWh of solar energy is equivalent to approximately 105 grams of carbon emitted when carbon emissions in their creation is divided by their lifetime (30 year) total production. Coal, on the other hand, has an average of 990 grams of carbon/ kWh and oil/diesel average at about 821g of carbon/ kWh. Natural gas comes in at a comparatively low carbon cost of 465g/kWh, but this does not take into account the negative externalities of fracking which often leave aquifers irreparably damaged. Wood/biomass — which is renewable and often considered rather clean — has a massive 1500g/kWh carbon emission (less of the other nasty nonsense coal emits like sulfur dioxide and acid gases).   When photovoltaics are compared to other commonplace methods of electrical generation in such a way the measures energy produced as opposed to emissions to create the product, it becomes self-evident that their creation, though somewhat carbon intensive from the factory point-of-view, pays for itself in very little time compared with their usable life.   Read More Here: http://solarenergy.net/energy-saving/putting-solar-savings-into-numbers/...

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As Coal Loses Its Stranglehold On The American Energy Market, Solar Can Pick Up Those Out Of Work

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A new study was released by the Journal of Energy Economics has proposed the notion that there may be a great amount of cross applicable skills between the U.S.’s current coal industry workforce and the emerging solar industry workforce, and that retraining of coal workers to work in solar is not only cost-effective for the solar industry, but also equates to better wages for the workforce. In the study, published by Joshua Pearce of Michigan Technological University and Edward Louie of Oregon State University, findings indicate that skilled labor involved in coal extraction to coal consumption could easily be brought into the renewable energy fold with minimal retraining. This is good news for the U.S.’s coal workers, as the coal industry is likely to continue to downsize its workforce as coal becomes an increasingly unattractive means of producing energy and the costs of clean renewable options continue to come down. The labor-intesivity of solar installations means that many more jobs are created in solar then are lost in coal when replacing a coal fired power plant with photovoltaic panels, while also reducing danger to workers in comparison to coal extraction. Read more here:...

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Community Solar Loved by Residents and Businesses

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Here at Soveren we know we have some great deals to offer, but there is a gap to bridge between us being able to accurately portray the opportunities we offer and a customer coming to understand how community solar is a hot ticket item. So, in lieu of going into depth about it here, I’d like to point you towards an article Forbes posted the other day about why they love community solar. Take a look at what Forbes is saying about community solar and its benefits. Here in Vermont we may be the some of the least capitalist-leaning Americans, but when a business magazine who’s motto is “The Capitalist Tool” decides to praise business models centered around community, we may do well to pay attention. Read More Here: http://www.forbes.com/sites/edfenergyexchange/2016/08/01/10-reasons-why-we-love-community-solar/#35cfad691c4d...

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Solar Boom Takes 2016 by Storm, More Brewing on the Horizon

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2016 has already been an enormous year for the solar industry. In the first quarter of 2016 the U.S. has installed 1.665 gigawatts (GW) of Solar — a 25% increase from the first quarter of 2015 — and is on track to seeing a 94% increase in installed solar capacity in the U.S. from 2015, with 64% of new energy generating capacity in the U.S. to coming from solar. For reference of scale, the average Vermont household requires about 12 kW of installed solar to offset their consumption, so the amount of solar installed in the first quarter would be enough to offset approximately 140,000 average Vermont homes. While the amount of domestic solar installed will have nearly doubled by the end of the year, this is comparatively small when compared to the solar behemoth emerging in China. China has reported that they’ve installed over 20 gigawatts in the first half of 2016, already beating their government mandated quota of 18.1 GW to be installed this year.   Read more here:   http://www.seia.org/research-resources/us-solar-market-insight  ...

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