Posts Tagged "large solar farm"

Why Spring is the best time to invest in solar…

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Why Spring is the best time to invest in solar…

For many, the end of the year looks like a juicy time to invest in solar. You can squeeze in those tax credits to cover what you owe and make the books look nice and balanced for the coming year. For some this type of thinking isn’t even on the radar. However, when we use a renewable source of energy, the natural cycles come into play in a big way. Everyone who is thinking about going solar, or looking at the state of their solar credits should understand these cycles. Vermont Community Solar makes going solar so simple that many participants forget that their power is actually being generated by the sun. Here’s the scoop… Buying VCS panels is like buying stock in the sun except this market never crashes. It is always in the positive and will always make you money. How much money depends on the season. To put it simplistically, in the stock market, you buy low priced stocks, sit back, watch them grow, and sell them at a higher price. There are similarities when going solar. While the sunshine market is much less volatile, you will see your solar credits grow throughout the summer and dip in the winter. Knowing these cycles is useful when investing in solar. If you buy panels in the fall, you will have minimal return until the following spring when the sun rises higher in the sky and the days get longer. If you buy panels in the Spring, you will watch your return rise to its peak in the Summer. Starting out in the green (or the most green) can be helpful when taking the financing option. This way, you will start out with the maximum amount of credit to weather what minimal volatility there is throughout the year. So, buy panels in the spring and watch your electricity bill dissolve in the...

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2014: 173,807 jobs and a new installation every 2.5 minutes

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2014: 173,807 jobs and a new installation every 2.5 minutes

This is what the solar industry has brought us in 2014. An article published today highlighted the invaluable progress that the solar industry has had on the market in recent years. Imitating what the president said in his state of the union address, “America installed twenty-two times more solar in 2014 than in 2008”. That is a remarkable increase for an economy just on the brink of recovery. This growth is defined in detail in The Energy Collective’s new article.    The most excitement I get from this article are the numbers in job growth. 80,000 new jobs in the solar industry since 2008. Now this is by no means enough to keep up with the growth required by our current form of economics. However, for a relatively new industry, it begs attention. I am even inclined to argue that it is a step in the right direction for our investment in the future. It is a solid investment, whatever the intentions. Read the full article...

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Victory Gardens for the New Milennium

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December 2, 2014 (Posted by Lisa via Anna) As I walked out to my office just now, light snow was sifting from the sky. In early December, most gardeners in Vermont expect to be taking some hard earned deep breaths, gazing in satisfaction at the produce in the root cellar, the freezer, or on the pantry shelves, and enjoying thinking about something other than gardening for a little while. Meanwhile, the Soveren/Vermont Community Solar team was working up in Groton today, beginning installation on a collaborative project with local Groton solar developer Bruce Genereaux (gmcommunitysolar.com). And there are more miles to go before the crew sleeps this winter. Working outside in the winter is hard. No two ways about it. Sometimes, life calls us to do the hard thing.   And since when is hard a bad thing? (Take that any way you like, people!) Ask anyone who lived through World War II in the U.S.—anyone who wasn’t uberwealthy, I mean—about those times. Ask them about victory gardens and rationing. Ask them about working two or three jobs and taking care of the kids and wondering if this would be the day you heard that your beloved was dead. My experience suggests you’ll hear something like, “Yes, those were hard times, but they were good times, too. We all know we were in it together, we needed each other and so we helped each other.” The Soveren/VCS crew is out planting victory gardens in 18 degree weather and I’m dreaming about the ancestors. (Yes, this Vice President in Charge of Relations is a tough job, but someone’s got to do it!) Feeling them in my numb fingertips as I fill the chickens’ waterer from the brook in these cold mornings. Feeling their strong backs, their strong legs, their strong cores, as I shoveled last week’s snow. Imagining how the snow would feel to me if there were no engines. Imagining living through winters more fierce than any living Vermonter has experienced on a regular basis in uninsulated dwellings. Imagining living through those long, fierce winters with no source of light or heat except fire. Imagining walking from Georgia to Canada barefoot not by choice but because I have nothing, because I myself am property according to the law of the land. There are no packages of food waiting for me at the post office in the next town. I’m hungry and on the run from dogs and two-leggeds more vicious than dogs could ever be. Imagining walking out into a Vermont winter night with three kids and not much else, not because we’ve decided to live simply or go on a vision quest but because home is more dangerous than the cold. Because I have nothing, because women are property according to the law of the land. Imagining going into winter after a poor harvest season with no means of getting food from someplace more fortunate. The ancestors of this land—indigenous American, children of Africa, and Europeans alike—were tough. They all knew about doing the hard thing–and going on doing it, month after month, year after year, decade after decade. We need their perspective now. We need their strength now. We need their perseverance now. We need their fierce love of life now. Because in case someone hasn’t noticed, times are tough in Vermont, all over the U.S. Times are tough all over this Blue Planet, and not only for our human relations. An undeclared worldwide covert war has been in progress for longer than a Hundred Years. Only now do many of us begin to how much has already been lost and how horrific today’s losses are. Collectively, our ancestors have seen a lot of war, covert and overt, domestic and international. We need their wisdom now. When I listen to my...

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Brattleboro Schools Go Solar

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A GOOD DAY FOR SOLAR! The Brattleboro Town School District has signed a solar Net Metering Credit Purchase Agreement with Soveren Solar that will save the schools 10% on their electricity bills. Soveren Solar is developing the 500 kW solar farm, which will generate approximately $130,000 in net metering credits per year. The net metering credits will be applied to the Brattleboro Schools electricity bills, and the School District will purchase the credits for 90% of their value, resulting in estimated annual savings of $13,000. The solar farm will be located in Westminster, VT and will be interconnected to Green Mountain Power’s utility grid. The Brattleboro schools will form a net metering group, which will allow the net metering credits generated by the solar farm to offset the charges for the schools electricity consumption. In addition to immediate savings of 10% on electricity, the value of the net metering credits will increase in parallel with electricity rates, protecting the schools from rising electricity costs. The solar farm will be owned by an investor group that will be able to take advantage of the tax incentives available for solar. The tax incentives, which are not available to the School District as a non-taxed entity, are instrumental to reducing the net cost of the solar farm, and providing the schools with a 10% discount on the purchase of the net metering credits. The Brattleboro School District will not be an owner of the solar farm, and is not responsible for any aspect of its financing, operations or maintenance. The net metering credit purchase agreement is set for a term of 20 years, with an option for the School District to purchase the solar farm at fair market value after 7 years. Soveren Solar has begun the permitting process for the solar farm by submitting applications for utility interconnection and a Certificate of Public Good from the Public Service Board. The permitting process is expected to take approximately 6 months to complete, and installation is expected to take approximately 3 months. The goal is to have the solar farm completed by the end of 2013. Once the solar farm is completed, Brattleboro Schools will have the ability to monitor the electricity production data in real time through a web portal, which will provide valuable learning opportunities. Soveren Solar is very pleased to announce this exciting agreement with the Brattleboro Town School District. The solar farm will expand the role of renewable energy in Windham County, reduce the greenhouse gas emissions associated with fossil fuel electricity generation, stimulate the local economy, save the School District money, and provide exciting learning opportunities for students. Soveren Solar is a local solar installation and development company based in Westminster West, with more than 30 solar installations operating in Windham County. In 2012 Soveren Solar entered into a net metering credit purchase agreement with the Grammar School in Putney, VT that allowed the school to build a 52 kW solar farm. Soveren Solar is proud to provide solar development strategies that have allowed many area farms, and non-taxable entities such as schools and municipalities the opportunity to Go Solar! Update: 3/27/13 This great news was covered in The Commons. The article can be read here or downloaded here:Commons-3-27-13-brattleboro-school-board-solar-soveren. Update This was also covered in the Brattleboro Reformer. The article can be read...

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